Duke Meets Mort (1992), Robert Carl

Duke Meets Mort (1992), Robert Carl

"Duke Meets Mort is a meeting at a 'summit' between two American originals, who, while we mourn their loss, can now hopefully get to know one another a little better. Specifically, the piece takes six chords (never in quite their original sequence) from Duke Ellington's Mood Indigo and interprets them freely in the voice of Morton Feldman. I've always felt a correspondence between Ellington's Indigos and Feldman's delicate, ethereal vision, so this 'jam' should not be too much of a surprise. Read more »

Duke Meets Mort (1992), Robert Carl

Duke Meets Mort is a meeting at a ‘summit’ between two American originals, who, while we mourn their loss, can now hopefully get to know one another a little better. Specifically, the piece takes six chords (never in quite their original sequence) from Duke Ellington’s Mood Indigo and interprets them freely in the voice of Morton Feldman. I’ve always felt a correspondence between Ellington’s Indigos and Feldman’s delicate, ethereal vision, so this ‘jam’ should not be too much of a surprise. Read more »

Carl, Robert

1954 —

Carl, Robert, American composer, is chair of composition at the Hartt School of Music, University of Hartford. He is co-director of the concert series Performance 20/20, co-director of Extension Works (Boston), and artistic director of the Hartt Contemporary Players. His composition teachers include Jonathan Kramer, George Rochberg and Ralph Shapey, as well as Betsy Jolas and Iannis Xenakis, in Paris, where he was a Lurcy Fellow. Read more »

Duke Meets Mort (1992), Robert Carl

Genre: 
Sax Quartets 1978 - Present
Composer: 
Carl
Composer First Names: 
Robert
Composition Date: 
1992
Composed for the ASQ: 

A delightful potpourri

Works reviewed: 
Sax Appeal (1990), David Stock
Duke Meets Mort (1992), Robert Carl
Drastic Measures, Russell Peck
Ditties (1997), Kim D. Sherman
Buffalo News, The
Buffalo, NY
Mar 30 2001
By: 
Garaud MacTaggart

Ever Since Adolphe Sax invented his lung- and reed-powered assemblage of curved metal tubing and multitudinous buttons, there have been classical composers that were intrigued by its sonic possibilities. These days it is an instrument more closely associated with jazz, blues and honkin' R&B instead of Debussy, Glazunov and Hindemith. Now, on the cusp of a new century, things are meshing together, and a new generation of classical composers is still looking at and being intrigued by this unique instrument. Read more »

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