Get Management

Get Management

Managements want to represent seasoned professionals. The experience of booking yourself will teach you better what to expect from management.
For example, if the concert presenter (the person who hired you to give a concert in their venue) comes rushing backstage right after your performance and says they will definitely hire you back for next year, you should be pleased. A seasoned performer will know this is an indication that  the presenter is happy, but will also understand that the chance the presenter will ACTUALLY hire them again in less than five years is very small. If you have not had this experience as a self-managed artist, you may blame the professional manager of incompetence. (This will make everybody unhappy.)
There is a bewildering array of concert managers/booking agents. A good place to find many of them is the Musical America annual issue. Look for management companies that seem to have ensembles that are somewhat similar to you, but nott too similar. What you want is someone who understands what you do, and already has the attention of concert presenters that may want what you do. However, you also want to look for management that does not represent groups exactly like yours.
Obtaining professional management is usually the result of a long-term courtship. A good manager will want to attend several of your live performances in venues with audiences similar to those of the presenters that the Management usually sells to. They will also assess how difficult you might be to work with. You need to do the same with them. You both need the right fit.
The single most important thing in my experience is that your Manager must be 'in love' with your group. It is really hard to sell concert music, and they have to believe in you. Have patience and don't jump into the wrong relationship.